Some wisdom quotes on survival and the afterlife

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For me it is sometimes good to refresh my mind with another dose of the truth and review some of the very informed opinions of experts with far more experience and knowledge than myself to remind me of the truth of the situation.

Some wisdom quotes, from Michael Tymn's blog at https://whitecrowbooks.com/michaeltymn/e...fe_part_2/ :

Quote:On Living in Eternity: “The luster of the present hour is always borrowed from the background of possibilities it goes with.  Let our common experiences be enveloped in an eternal moral order; let our suffering have an immortal significance; let Heaven smile upon the earth, and deities pay their visits; let faith and hope be the atmosphere which man breathes in; and his days pass by with zest; they stir with prospects, they thrill with remoter values.  Place around them on the contrary the curdling cold and gloom and absence of all permanent meaning which for pure naturalism and the popular-science evolutionism of our time are all that is visible ultimately, and the thrill stops short, or turns rather to an anxious trembling.”  
– William James, M.D. (American pioneer in psychiatry)

On Rediscovering the Soul: “When medical science has finally failed, my patients can only lie and wait. But now, for the first time in all of human experience, they wait without hope, without heart, tragically unaware of the reality of their undying souls. This ‘immaterial’ ingredient was sacrificed when we embarked on our perilous modern journey of materialism and scientific mechanism, of contingency and separateness. There can be only one solution. At all costs, our hearts must be retrieved, and our hope must be restored. There is only one way to do this: our very souls must be rediscovered.”
– Stephen J. Iacoboni, M.D. (Oncologist, “The Undying Soul”)

On Meeting Deceased Loved Ones: “I don’t know whether some kind of continued consciousness after death is the best explanation for NDEs (near-death experiences) in which experiencers see deceased loved ones no one knew had died.  But I don’t have any alternative explanation for the evidence. We may eventually come up with another explanation, but until then, some form of continued consciousness after death seems to be the most plausible working model.”
– Bruce Greyson, M.D. (Consciousness researcher, “After”)

On Solid Evidence: “In general I find much more support for survival than for God.  For me, there is ample empirical evidence for survival, so much from so many quarters that I regard it as proven.  But God’s reality is not so clear.  By that I mean I’m not very clear about what God is.  In particular, is God the kind of being that hears my heartfelt prayers?  And where do I meet God?  During deep meditation when I silence the inner chatter?  Is God in some sense the silence?  God to me remains something of a mystery, one I wish I could understand.  Mystical literature is a special help to me, and I share William James’ veneration of the mystic.  It does seem that the mystic makes contact with something utterly awesome.  I hope that’s God.”
– Stafford Betty, Ph.D. (“Heaven & Hell Unveiled))

On Awakening Varies: “[My research] has proven conclusively that death is only a sleep and an awakening, the process of awakening depending largely upon the individual’s mental attitude, such as religious bias, unreasoning skepticism, or the willful ignorance of and indifference to life’s meaning, so prevalent among the multitude.”
– Carl Wickland, M.D.  (“Thirty Years Among the Dead”)

On Skepticism & Debunking: “It is, of course, easy for the vociferous Sadducees of today to shrug their shoulders and assert that, as no evidence can establish such an impossible belief (survival of consciousness after death), they decline to waste their time in listening to nonsense.  They waive the whole matter aside with a superior gesture, confidently asserting that what cannot be explained by fraud, delusion, or subconscious memory is simply due to the ‘will to believe.’ But surely such agnostics might remember the ancient proverb: ‘He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him’.”
– Sir William Barrett (British physicist and inventor)
(This post was last modified: 2024-01-20, 04:06 PM by nbtruthman. Edited 1 time in total.)
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Thanks, that is an interesting read.

I should have replied yesterday, when my thought was fresh. The mention of 'Awakening' prompted a thought in me, on a theme I've reflected upon a number of times.  That is, in my opinion, something called by that word, 'awakening' may indeed be very relevant after our passing from this physical world. Yet at the same time every so often I get the urge to remind myself that there's no need to wait that long, awakening can be now. Perhaps even an imperative, ought to be now. But those are just maybes, I don't insist anyone agree.
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(2024-01-21, 12:06 PM)Typoz Wrote: Thanks, that is an interesting read.

I should have replied yesterday, when my thought was fresh. The mention of 'Awakening' prompted a thought in me, on a theme I've reflected upon a number of times.  That is, in my opinion, something called by that word, 'awakening' may indeed be very relevant after our passing from this physical world. Yet at the same time every so often I get the urge to remind myself that there's no need to wait that long, awakening can be now. Perhaps even an imperative, ought to be now. But those are just maybes, I don't insist anyone agree.

Bloomin right... they have pushed the problems of experience right to the end... don't worry, it will all be OK in the afterlife. I don't know what - if anything - emerges after life, or whether the definition of 'after' has any operational meaning after crossing that point.

What I do know, is that it's very convenient for the elites to push the problems of experience off to the end "just suck up the pain, injustice and suffering, everything will be OK afterwards".

I'm not in the least bit religious, but the deep wisdom I find hidden in the Gospel of Thomas, echo's this perspective:

(113) His disciples said to him, "When will the kingdom come?"
<Jesus said,> "It will not come by waiting for it. It will not be a matter of saying 'here it is' or 'there it is.' Rather, the kingdom of the father is spread out upon the earth, and men do not see it."

(Thomas O. Lambdin translation)
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring 
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
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