From London to Ancient Egypt: the Reincarnation of Dorothy Eady

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From London to Ancient Egypt: the Reincarnation of Dorothy Eady

Mona Abdou


Quote:Dorothy Eady was pronounced dead in her family’s London home at only three. She had been a lively child, bright-eyed and curious, born in January of 1904. Her fascination with life came to a brief, terrifying standstill that winter morning after suffering a fall down the stairwell. Only minutes after having been called in, the family doctor delivered the news to her parents: little Dorothy – a mess of birdbone limbs and youth – was dead.

Only she wasn’t, and an hour after her initial collapse, Eady was found upright and restless in her bed. Thankful and unquestioning, her parents dismissed the doctor; little did they know that the homemade miracle they’d witnessed was the onset of a new moon for reincarnation dialogues.

Eady would go on to become a modern colossus of controversy, notoriety, and interest – and she would do so by claiming herself a reborn ancient Egyptian priestess, Bentreshyt.

First I've heard of this case, so can't say too much about the veracity, but it's interesting to see the parallel to Replacement Reincarnation cases despite the massive time separation between lives.
'Historically, we may regard materialism as a system of dogma set up to combat orthodox dogma...Accordingly we find that, as ancient orthodoxies disintegrate, materialism more and more gives way to scepticism.'

- Bertrand Russell


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I've heard of this case, it has popped up several times over the years.

Reading that article (which I've not yet finished reading) I was distracted by the author's anachronism, "A few months later, Eady would come across glossy polaroids of Egypt" - that is, a few months later than [some time in 1908] she came across photographs from a camera not invented until 1948.

It's hard to say whether or not this satisfies the definition of 'replacement reincarnation'. After an NDE even adults often find they have new psychic  abilities of one sort or another, but generally the person does not appear to be someone else, merely the same person with gifts.

I've never quite had a full grasp of this case, perhaps because many of the sources which I'd come across years ago would tend to be somewhat unclear, in their desire to fascinate the reader but not alienate the establishment too much. It might be worth revisiting as nowadays there may be more thorough investigation and details available. What does seem clear is that Eady as an adult was a gifted Egyptologist, not just a crank.

I think this may be the BBC documentary mentioned.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn_ZIoidRxM
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National Geographic documentary, "Egypt: Quest for Eternity". Omm Sety is not mentioned until about 12 minutes. Not a moment too soon, she died soon after the filming was completed. More of a brief cameo appearance by her. Main emphasis of the film is the recording and preservation of the antiquities, interesting in its own right.



Psi Encyclopedia article on Dorothy Eady/Omm Sety including sceptical criticism:
https://psi-encyclopedia.spr.ac.uk/artic...dyomm-sety
(This post was last modified: 2021-09-21, 09:42 AM by Typoz.)
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(2021-09-20, 11:24 AM)Sciborg_S_Patel Wrote: From London to Ancient Egypt: the Reincarnation of Dorothy Eady

On rereading that article I'm struck by this paragraph,
Quote:Without hesitation, she pressed hands up to glass displays and knelt to kiss the feet of statues. It was a bizarre sight for onlookers, more so when Eady took a seat by a preserved mummy, and insisted that she be left there. When her mother made to pick her up, Eady is quoted as having reiterated: “Leave me here, these are my people!”

I understand that feeling. It's not really possible to live in the museum, but I had a similar feeling (though with different subject matter) in a museum that I visited in Paris. I was with work colleagues and we were just doing a sort of tourist tour of the city. The others were ready to move on, but I did not want to leave, for similar reasons.
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