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An effective energy healer
#1
Charlie Goldsmith, energy healer, article

Paper on testing him at a teaching hospital: Feasibility of Energy Medicine in a Community Teaching Hospital: An Exploratory Case Series, at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4485888/.

Results: Twenty-four of 32 patients requested relief from pain. Of 50 reports of pain, 5 (10%) showed no improvement; 4 (8%), slight improvement; 3 (6%), moderate improvement; and 38 (76%), marked improvement. Twenty-one patients had issues other than pain. Of 29 non–pain-related problems, 3 (10%) showed no, 2 (7%) showed slight, 1 (4%) showed moderate, and 23 (79%) showed marked improvement. Changes during EM sessions were usually immediate.

Conclusions: Most patients experienced marked, immediate improvement of symptoms associated with their chief complaint. Substantial practicality issues must be addressed to implement EM clinically in a hospital, however.

There is a new TV show on Goldsmith, in which he demonstrates his abilities on various patients, primarily where the basic problem is pain caused by various serious medical conditions, such as severe psoriatic arthritis as an example. Over the years he has been evaluated by numerous medical doctors, who acknowledge his abilities but have no idea how he is doing it. There seems to be no way to explain medically and scientifically what the mechanism is. The dramatic and lasting results go way beyond any possible effects of suggestion or placebo effect. The hundreds of patients don't care - it works for them. He receives no money for his services. 

It remains the materialists' problem how to claim he is a fraud.
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#2
(11-29-2017, 06:15 PM)nbtruthman Wrote: There is a new TV show on Goldsmith, in which he demonstrates his abilities on various patients, primarily where the basic problem is pain caused by various serious medical conditions, such as severe psoriatic arthritis as an example. Over the years he has been evaluated by numerous medical doctors, who acknowledge his abilities but have no idea how he is doing it. There seems to be no way to explain medically and scientifically what the mechanism is. The dramatic and lasting results go way beyond any possible effects of suggestion or placebo effect. The hundreds of patients don't care - it works for them. He receives no money for his services. 

I'm just curious about the statement that the results go way beyond the possible effects of suggestion, because very strong claims are made for the efficacy of hypnotic suggestion, including cures which don't seem explicable in conventional terms. I wonder whether it's possible that this man's technique has a lot in common with hypnotic suggestion.
"There are more things in philosophy than are dreamt of in heaven and earth."
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#3
(11-29-2017, 06:15 PM)nbtruthman Wrote: Charlie Goldsmith, energy healer, article

Paper on testing him at a teaching hospital: Feasibility of Energy Medicine in a Community Teaching Hospital: An Exploratory Case Series, at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4485888/.

Results: Twenty-four of 32 patients requested relief from pain. Of 50 reports of pain, 5 (10%) showed no improvement; 4 (8%), slight improvement; 3 (6%), moderate improvement; and 38 (76%), marked improvement. Twenty-one patients had issues other than pain. Of 29 non–pain-related problems, 3 (10%) showed no, 2 (7%) showed slight, 1 (4%) showed moderate, and 23 (79%) showed marked improvement. Changes during EM sessions were usually immediate.

Conclusions: Most patients experienced marked, immediate improvement of symptoms associated with their chief complaint. Substantial practicality issues must be addressed to implement EM clinically in a hospital, however.

There is a new TV show on Goldsmith, in which he demonstrates his abilities on various patients, primarily where the basic problem is pain caused by various serious medical conditions, such as severe psoriatic arthritis as an example. Over the years he has been evaluated by numerous medical doctors, who acknowledge his abilities but have no idea how he is doing it. There seems to be no way to explain medically and scientifically what the mechanism is. The dramatic and lasting results go way beyond any possible effects of suggestion or placebo effect. The hundreds of patients don't care - it works for them. He receives no money for his services. 

It remains the materialists' problem how to claim he is a fraud.

There are 50 healers within 30 minutes distance. Go talk to your "healers" and you will find the common thread is that the successful cases have patients/clients who believe that the "healer" can heal. See bolded above.

He cannot.

But they believe and beliefs create physical reality. The "healer" creates an environment and the vibratory resonance between the "healer" and the healed allows the patient/client to heal themselves. "You cannot be what you are not first the vibration of" and traditional medicine and materialistic science do not have consciousness (aligned with the fact that physical reality is dream, a co-creation of consciousness) in their vocabulary much less in their fundamental basis of knowledge.

Pain is nothing more than an individual's resistance to being their complete selves. The more we resist experience/the moment/Life, the more we resist our self, the more we feel our self. Pain is one of the most demanding experiences we can have. It simply does not let itself be ignored. Pain is not only a biological alarm signaling that something is wrong but also a spiritual one, if we're indeed to separate spirit and biology. The healing power of pain, and probably the reason why natural recovery of injury (in jury = in judgement = in resistance) is usually accompanied by a lot of pain, is the power to demand us to feel our self, and once having us reach a point of surrender, openness, acceptance, allowance and keen awareness in the moment, pain ceases.

Because we are now "feeling good" again.
Existence is not subject to time; time is subject to Existence.
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#4
(11-29-2017, 06:47 PM)Chris Wrote: I'm just curious about the statement that the results go way beyond the possible effects of suggestion, because very strong claims are made for the efficacy of hypnotic suggestion, including cures which don't seem explicable in conventional terms. I wonder whether it's possible that this man's technique has a lot in common with hypnotic suggestion.

I've watched several episodes of his show (The Healer), and the procedure is very quick and informal, with no hypnotic suggestions or induction technique, and the patient isn't placed in any sort of altered consciousness. Of course the very situation amounts to suggestion as far as the patient is concerned, but the relief of pain is usually instant, after just a couple of minutes with Goldsmith. Susceptibility to hypnotic suggestion is supposed to be relatively rare in the population, whereas most of Goldsmith's patients obtain very good results. It just doesn't look like hypnotic suggestion, but I suppose anything is possible.
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#5
(11-29-2017, 08:25 PM)nbtruthman Wrote: I've watched several episodes of his show (The Healer), and the procedure is very quick and informal, with no hypnotic suggestions or induction technique, and the patient isn't placed in any sort of altered consciousness. Of course the very situation amounts to suggestion as far as the patient is concerned, but the relief of pain is usually instant, after just a couple of minutes with Goldsmith. Susceptibility to hypnotic suggestion is supposed to be relatively rare in the population, whereas most of Goldsmith's patients obtain very good results. It just doesn't look like hypnotic suggestion, but I suppose anything is possible.

I'm not an expert on hypnotherapy, but I've been reading a little about it, and I think the idea is that effective suggestion is possible without necessarily putting the patient into a trance, and that it can be done in a variety of ways.
"There are more things in philosophy than are dreamt of in heaven and earth."
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#6
(11-29-2017, 06:47 PM)Chris Wrote: I'm just curious about the statement that the results go way beyond the possible effects of suggestion, because very strong claims are made for the efficacy of hypnotic suggestion, including cures which don't seem explicable in conventional terms. I wonder whether it's possible that this man's technique has a lot in common with hypnotic suggestion.

Yes that’s a very good point imho. Both for chronic and acute pain.
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#7
(11-29-2017, 11:52 PM)Chris Wrote: I'm not an expert on hypnotherapy, but I've been reading a little about it, and I think the idea is that effective suggestion is possible without necessarily putting the patient into a trance, and that it can be done in a variety of ways.

Various  types of distraction are also used in hypnotherapy - these don’t require trance (so I’m not sure they’d qualify as Hypno but certainly therapeutic Smile).
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#8
(11-30-2017, 11:26 AM)Obiwan Wrote: Yes that’s a very good point imho. Both for chronic and acute pain.

I don't think there's any doubt at all that hypnotherapy can relieve pain, to the extent that people can undergo surgery without anaesthetic. 

I don't know to what extent that process is understood in conventional terms, but I find it quite believable from personal experience, because at one time I had quite bad toothache, and found the pain went away completely while I did a "brain-training" task that required intense concentration. It wasn't just just that I wasn't thinking about it - I thought about it, and was aware that the pain had gone away.
"There are more things in philosophy than are dreamt of in heaven and earth."
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#9
(11-30-2017, 11:59 AM)Chris Wrote: I don't think there's any doubt at all that hypnotherapy can relieve pain, to the extent that people can undergo surgery without anaesthetic. 

I don't know to what extent that process is understood in conventional terms, but I find it quite believable from personal experience, because at one time I had quite bad toothache, and found the pain went away completely while I did a "brain-training" task that required intense concentration. It wasn't just just that I wasn't thinking about it - I thought about it, and was aware that the pain had gone away.

I think it depends which technique is referred to. Distraction can be very powerful, speaking from personal experience, as I suffer from neuralgia. I find if I am engaged in a task that requires concentration I do not notice the pain but soon as I stop, it floods  back.

I have also heard that it is possIble to override nerve signals for pain by introducing a signal that the brain treats more urgently such as touch (hence apparently the effectiveness of rubbing or heat).
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#10
From a research paper, at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3324744/:

Quote:"Hypnosis is an effective method for acute and chronic pain, but there are also a few limitations. First, it is only effective in patients with high hypnotic susceptibility. The anticipated analgesic effect is not achieved in low to moderately hypnotizable patients."
 

Persons with high hypnotic susceptibility consist of only 5% to 10% of the population. Goldsmith has apparently been successful with the great majority of his pain patients.

Quote:"Second, there can be psychiatric complications in chronic pain patients. However, in chronic pain patients, their actual hypnotizability scores are not consistent with ERS (Eye-Roll Sign test, scale of biological trance capacity). Instead, they are usually lower, since many of them are suffering from anxiety, depression, drug abuse, and personality changes, such as dependency and regression. Therefore, in chronic pain, the effect of hypnosis can be limited."
 

Goldsmith seems to be even more successful with the most difficult patients.

Quote:"Third, there are perceptions and expectations regarding hypnosis, and in many cases, patients expect that the pain will completely vanish during hypnosis. However, in chronic pain patients, even with high hypnotizability, the pain may decrease or disappear during hypnosis, but in most cases, the pain returns after a certain period after the hypnosis."

On the TV show, treated patients are reevaluated at two months. Many of them are severe pain cases. At least in the cases shown, the pain relief has held over that period.

I would be surprised if the effect of suggestion without any hypnotic induction could be even more effective than hypnotherapy, and also not have the limitations noted above.
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