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2012 double-slit study by Radin et al.
#1
Gabriel Guerrer has just published the results of a double-slit experiment, which is being discussed here:
http://psiencequest.net/forums/thread-270.html

It's a follow-up to a previous study by Radin et al., published in 2012, and available here:
http://deanradin.com/evidence/Radin2012doubleslit.pdf

The Skeptiko discussion on Radin's paper is here:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/de...ents.2467/
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#2
There is a three-part sceptical "rebuttal" of Radin's study here:
https://barenormality.wordpress.com/2012...uble-slit/

I looked at it a while ago - more than four years, in fact - and felt that while there might be some truth in the criticisms, they weren't adequate to explain the results. I commented to that effect, but didn't get any response, though to be fair the article was more than a year old by that time.
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#3
(09-03-2017, 08:33 PM)Chris Wrote: Gabriel Guerrer has just published the results of a double-slit experiment, which is being discussed here:
http://psiencequest.net/forums/thread-270.html

It's a follow-up to a previous study by Radin et al., published in 2012, and available here:
http://deanradin.com/evidence/Radin2012doubleslit.pdf

The Skeptiko discussion on Radin's paper is here:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/de...ents.2467/

Here's some criticism of mine on another thread

http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/cl...ost-111868
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#4
I don't see that the study was pre-registered with either the KPU registry or the OSF registry. The lack of a common outcome measure in these studies will be a problem (with regard to general acceptance), I suspect.

It will be interesting to see if anyone in physics begins to become excited about this research. Wouldn't it be of relevance to any researcher working with double-slit experiments for other research questions?

Linda
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#5
(09-04-2017, 03:33 PM)The fls Wrote: I don't see that the study was pre-registered with either the KPU registry or the OSF registry. The lack of a common outcome measure in these studies will be a problem (with regard to general acceptance), I suspect.

It will be interesting to see if anyone in physics begins to become excited about this research. Wouldn't it be of relevance to any researcher working with double-slit experiments for other research questions?

Linda

Guerrer's study is hosted as a preprint in the OSF... Manuscripts are technically not final nor yet peer reviewed.
"Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before..."
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#6
@Chris: I don't know if he is still hanging around, but since he is registered you should probably PM Dean out of courtesy.
"Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before..."
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#7
fls!

~~ Paul
If the existence of a thing is indistinguishable from its nonexistence, we say that thing does not exist. ---Yahzi
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#8
I thought it might be useful to post links and abstracts for the four papers by Radin et al. on this subject.

(1) http://deanradin.com/evidence/Radin2012doubleslit.pdf
Consciousness and the double-slit interference pattern: Six experiments
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, Karla Galdamez, Paul Wendland, Robert Rickenbach and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 25(2), 157-171 (2012)
A double-slit optical system was used to test the possible role of consciousness in the
collapse of the quantum wavefunction. The ratio of the interference pattern’s double-slit spectral
power to its single-slit spectral power was predicted to decrease when attention was focused toward
the double slit as compared to away from it. Each test session consisted of 40 counterbalanced
attention-toward and attention-away epochs, where each epoch lasted between 15 and 30 s. Data
contributed by 137 people in six experiments, involving a total of 250 test sessions, indicate that on
average the spectral ratio decreased as predicted (z=-4.36, p=6x10-6). Another 250 control
sessions conducted without observers present tested hardware, software, and analytical procedures
for potential artifacts; none were identified (z=0.43, p=0.67). Variables including temperature,
vibration, and signal drift were also tested, and no spurious influences were identified. By contrast,
factors associated with consciousness, such as meditation experience, electrocortical markers of
focused attention, and psychological factors including openness and absorption, significantly
correlated in predicted ways with perturbations in the double-slit interference pattern. The results
appear to be consistent with a consciousness-related interpretation of the quantum measurement
problem.

(2) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinPhysi...ys2013.pdf
Psychophysical interactions with a double-slit interference pattern
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, James Johnston and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 26(4), 553-566 (2013)
Previously reported experiments suggested that interference patterns generated by a
double-slit optical system were perturbed by a psychophysical (i.e., mind–matter) interaction.
Three new experiments were conducted to further investigate this phenomenon. The first study consisted
of 50 half-hour test sessions where participants concentrated their attention-toward or -away
from a double-slit system located 3 m away. The spectral magnitude and phase associated with the
double-slit component of the interference pattern were compared between the two attention conditions,
and the combined results provided evidence for an interaction (effect size = -0.73 +/- 0.14,
p = 2.4x10-7). One hundred control sessions using the same equipment, protocol and analysis,
but without participants present, showed no effect (effect size = 0.04 +/- 0.10, p = 0.71). A
Fraunhofer diffraction model was used to explore various interpretations of this outcome. This
analysis suggested that the distribution of light between the two slits and the horizontal stability of
the laser beam were the principle components of the optical system that were perturbed. The second
experiment used a duplicate double-slit system and similar test protocol, but it was conducted
over the Internet by streaming data to participants’ web browsers. Some 685 people from six continents
contributed 2089 experimental sessions. Results were similar to those observed in the first
experiment, but smaller in magnitude (effect size = -0.09 +/- 0.02, p = 2.6x10-6). Data from 2303
control sessions, conducted automatically every 2 h using the same equipment but without observers
showed no effect (effect size = -0.01 +/- 0.02, p = 0.61). Distance between participants and the
optical system, ranging from 1 km to 18,000 km, showed no correlation with experimental effect
size. The third experiment used a newly designed double-slit system, a revised test protocol, and a
simpler method of statistical analysis. Twenty sessions contributed by 10 participants successfully
replicated the interaction effect observed in the first two studies (effect size = -0.62 +/- 0.22,
p = 0.006).

(3) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinQuant...ms2015.pdf
Psychophysical interactions with a single-photon double-slit optical system
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, Alan Pierce and Arnaud Delorme
Quantum Biosystems 6(1), 82-98 (2015)
Six experiments were conducted using a single-photon double-slit apparatus to test von
Neumann's notion that the quantum wavefunction is “collapsed” by what he called a
psychophysical interaction. Individuals were asked to direct their attention toward or away from
the optical system while receiving information about the number of photons arriving per second
at an interference fringe minimum. Overall the experiments found evidence supportive of an
interaction that appears to “steer” the wavefunction to either reduce or to sharpen interference
fringes. This outcome informs efforts to unify subjective and objective modes of apprehending
the world because it suggests that these two apparently different ways of knowing may be
complementary aspects of a unitary phenomenon, analogous to how a Möbius strip appears to
have two sides, but when examined is found to have only one. The correlations observed in our
experiments can be interpreted in two main ways: as a form of mind-matter interaction, which
implies a dualistic model, or as arising from a common source, which implies a monist model. We
propose that a monist model is a more satisfying explanation.

(4) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinPhysi...ys2016.pdf
Psychophysical modulation of fringe visibility in a distant doubleslit optical system
Dean Radin, Leena Michel and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 29(1), 14-22 (2016)
To investigate von Neumann’s proposal that an “extra-physical process” is
involved in the measurement of a quantum system, an online experiment was conducted
using a double-slit optical system. In a counterbalanced fashion, participants focused their
attention toward or away from a feedback signal linked in real-time to the double-slit
component of an interference pattern. A line camera continuously recorded the interference
pattern at 4 Hz, and for each camera image fringe visibility was determined for the central 20
fringes. During 2013 and 2014, a total of 1,479 people from 77 countries contributed 2,985
test sessions. Over the same period 5,738 sessions were run as controls by a computer
programmed to simulate human participants. The results showed that with human observers
the fringe visibility at the center of the interference pattern deviated from a null effect by 5.72
sigma (p = 1.05×10-8), with the direction of the deviation conforming to the observers’
intentions. The same analysis applied to the control data resulted in an overall deviation of
-0.17 sigma. After consideration of alternative explanations, these results were found to
support von Neumann’s conclusion that the mind of the observer is an inextricable part of the
measurement process. This type of experiment offers a means of empirically resolving longstanding
questions about the role of consciousness in the physical world.
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#9
And here is an earlier paper which was the first to use a double-slit in parapsychological research:

https://www.scientificexploration.org/do...ibison.pdf
A Double-Slit Diffraction Experiment to Investigate Claims of Consciousness-Related Anomalies 
Michael Ibison and Stanley Jeffers
Journal of Scientific Exploration 12(4), 543-550 (1998)
An experiment in which participants were asked to reduce the fringe contrast in a Young’s double-slit interference pattern has been conducted independently at two laboratories using the same apparatus. Participants at York University were explicitly invited to exert their intentionality either to direct the photon flux preferentially through one path or the other, or to obtain spatial information about the division of the flux. Participants at Princeton University were invited simply to reduce the fringe contrast by any strategy they wished. Results from both laboratories (Z =-0.481 and Z = 1.654 respectively) are discussed along with a description of earlier efforts to frame this experiment as a test of an extra-sensory channel for the acquisition of information. 
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#10
(09-20-2017, 05:10 PM)Chris Wrote: I thought it might be useful to post links and abstracts for the four papers by Radin et al. on this subject.

(1) http://deanradin.com/evidence/Radin2012doubleslit.pdf
Consciousness and the double-slit interference pattern: Six experiments
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, Karla Galdamez, Paul Wendland, Robert Rickenbach and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 25(2), 157-171 (2012)
A double-slit optical system was used to test the possible role of consciousness in the
collapse of the quantum wavefunction. The ratio of the interference pattern’s double-slit spectral
power to its single-slit spectral power was predicted to decrease when attention was focused toward
the double slit as compared to away from it. Each test session consisted of 40 counterbalanced
attention-toward and attention-away epochs, where each epoch lasted between 15 and 30 s. Data
contributed by 137 people in six experiments, involving a total of 250 test sessions, indicate that on
average the spectral ratio decreased as predicted (z=-4.36, p=6x10-6). Another 250 control
sessions conducted without observers present tested hardware, software, and analytical procedures
for potential artifacts; none were identified (z=0.43, p=0.67). Variables including temperature,
vibration, and signal drift were also tested, and no spurious influences were identified. By contrast,
factors associated with consciousness, such as meditation experience, electrocortical markers of
focused attention, and psychological factors including openness and absorption, significantly
correlated in predicted ways with perturbations in the double-slit interference pattern. The results
appear to be consistent with a consciousness-related interpretation of the quantum measurement
problem.

(2) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinPhysi...ys2013.pdf
Psychophysical interactions with a double-slit interference pattern
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, James Johnston and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 26(4), 553-566 (2013)
Previously reported experiments suggested that interference patterns generated by a
double-slit optical system were perturbed by a psychophysical (i.e., mind–matter) interaction.
Three new experiments were conducted to further investigate this phenomenon. The first study consisted
of 50 half-hour test sessions where participants concentrated their attention-toward or -away
from a double-slit system located 3 m away. The spectral magnitude and phase associated with the
double-slit component of the interference pattern were compared between the two attention conditions,
and the combined results provided evidence for an interaction (effect size = -0.73 +/- 0.14,
p = 2.4x10-7). One hundred control sessions using the same equipment, protocol and analysis,
but without participants present, showed no effect (effect size = 0.04 +/- 0.10, p = 0.71). A
Fraunhofer diffraction model was used to explore various interpretations of this outcome. This
analysis suggested that the distribution of light between the two slits and the horizontal stability of
the laser beam were the principle components of the optical system that were perturbed. The second
experiment used a duplicate double-slit system and similar test protocol, but it was conducted
over the Internet by streaming data to participants’ web browsers. Some 685 people from six continents
contributed 2089 experimental sessions. Results were similar to those observed in the first
experiment, but smaller in magnitude (effect size = -0.09 +/- 0.02, p = 2.6x10-6). Data from 2303
control sessions, conducted automatically every 2 h using the same equipment but without observers
showed no effect (effect size = -0.01 +/- 0.02, p = 0.61). Distance between participants and the
optical system, ranging from 1 km to 18,000 km, showed no correlation with experimental effect
size. The third experiment used a newly designed double-slit system, a revised test protocol, and a
simpler method of statistical analysis. Twenty sessions contributed by 10 participants successfully
replicated the interaction effect observed in the first two studies (effect size = -0.62 +/- 0.22,
p = 0.006).

(3) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinQuant...ms2015.pdf
Psychophysical interactions with a single-photon double-slit optical system
Dean Radin, Leena Michel, Alan Pierce and Arnaud Delorme
Quantum Biosystems 6(1), 82-98 (2015)
Six experiments were conducted using a single-photon double-slit apparatus to test von
Neumann's notion that the quantum wavefunction is “collapsed” by what he called a
psychophysical interaction. Individuals were asked to direct their attention toward or away from
the optical system while receiving information about the number of photons arriving per second
at an interference fringe minimum. Overall the experiments found evidence supportive of an
interaction that appears to “steer” the wavefunction to either reduce or to sharpen interference
fringes. This outcome informs efforts to unify subjective and objective modes of apprehending
the world because it suggests that these two apparently different ways of knowing may be
complementary aspects of a unitary phenomenon, analogous to how a Möbius strip appears to
have two sides, but when examined is found to have only one. The correlations observed in our
experiments can be interpreted in two main ways: as a form of mind-matter interaction, which
implies a dualistic model, or as arising from a common source, which implies a monist model. We
propose that a monist model is a more satisfying explanation.

(4) http://deanradin.com/evidence/RadinPhysi...ys2016.pdf
Psychophysical modulation of fringe visibility in a distant doubleslit optical system
Dean Radin, Leena Michel and Arnaud Delorme
Physics Essays 29(1), 14-22 (2016)
To investigate von Neumann’s proposal that an “extra-physical process” is
involved in the measurement of a quantum system, an online experiment was conducted
using a double-slit optical system. In a counterbalanced fashion, participants focused their
attention toward or away from a feedback signal linked in real-time to the double-slit
component of an interference pattern. A line camera continuously recorded the interference
pattern at 4 Hz, and for each camera image fringe visibility was determined for the central 20
fringes. During 2013 and 2014, a total of 1,479 people from 77 countries contributed 2,985
test sessions. Over the same period 5,738 sessions were run as controls by a computer
programmed to simulate human participants. The results showed that with human observers
the fringe visibility at the center of the interference pattern deviated from a null effect by 5.72
sigma (p = 1.05×10-8), with the direction of the deviation conforming to the observers’
intentions. The same analysis applied to the control data resulted in an overall deviation of
-0.17 sigma. After consideration of alternative explanations, these results were found to
support von Neumann’s conclusion that the mind of the observer is an inextricable part of the
measurement process. This type of experiment offers a means of empirically resolving longstanding
questions about the role of consciousness in the physical world.

[/url]
Quote:And here is an earlier paper which was the first to use a double-slit in parapsychological research:
[url=https://www.scientificexploration.org/docs/12/jse_12_4_ibison.pdf]htt
ps://www.scientificexploration.org/do...ibison.pdf
A Double-Slit Diffraction Experiment to Investigate Claims of Consciousness-Related Anomalies 
Michael Ibison and Stanley Jeffers
Journal of Scientific Exploration 12(4), 543-550 (1998)
An experiment in which participants were asked to reduce the fringe contrast in a Young’s double-slit interference pattern has been conducted independently at two laboratories using the same apparatus. Participants at York University were explicitly invited to exert their intentionality either to direct the photon flux preferentially through one path or the other, or to obtain spatial information about the division of the flux. Participants at Princeton University were invited simply to reduce the fringe contrast by any strategy they wished. Results from both laboratories (Z =-0.481 and Z = 1.654 respectively) are discussed along with a description of earlier efforts to frame this experiment as a test of an extra-sensory channel for the acquisition of information. 

Are you saying these studies represent strong (albeit very dry) evidence for psi?
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