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This has probably been asked before ...but
#1
Anyone who's had an operation under general anaesthetic knows that, at least in my case, it's the only time in my life that we really 'lost consciousness'. From the time that the chemical is injected and starting to count backwards from 100, 99,98, 97,96....then waking up maybe hours later! 

This seems to imply that our consciousness can be switched off by drugs. 

If it can be switched off by drugs, why not switched on by drugs? i.e. Generated by the brain.

Thoughts?
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#2
It could be memory not consciousness.

They often give drugs that specifically cause amnesia during surgery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug-induced_amnesia

Quote:Amnesia is desirable during surgery, since a general anaesthetic should also give the person amnesia for the operation. Sedatives such as benzodiazepines, which are commonly used for anxiety disorders, can reduce the encoding of new memories, particularly in high doses (for example, prior to surgery in order for a person not to recall the surgery).
The first gulp from the glass of science will make you an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you - Werner Heisenberg. (More at my Blog & Website)
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#3
(10-09-2017, 08:25 AM)Jim_Smith Wrote: It could be memory not consciousness.

They often give drugs that specifically cause amnesia during surgery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug-induced_amnesia

It's possible, but to me they seem very different.

To me, the effect of being anaesthetised is very different from having no memory of something. Like for example when I have slept for some hours but can't remember dreaming, I don't feel that there was nothing there. Although I can not remember any of my dreams during that time, it doesn't appear that 'time passed had been instantaneous' as it does when I'm operated on.

In other words, during an operation, 'light out' to 'lights on' seems instantaneous. Nothing else has that effect, as far as I can work out.

Maybe that effect can be caused by amnesia brought on by the anaesthetist but it sure feels very different.
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#4
Most people who believe in reincarnation and the afterlife don't consider their lack of memories of the spirit realm to be an obstacle to belief in the afterlife.

If the brain is a filter of consciousness rather than producing consciousness, then while we are incarnated, turning off the brain with anesthesia might plausibly produce the effect you describe.

http://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/sk...cies_brain
The first gulp from the glass of science will make you an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you - Werner Heisenberg. (More at my Blog & Website)
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#5
(10-09-2017, 08:56 AM)Jim_Smith Wrote: Most people who believe in reincarnation and the afterlife don't consider their lack of memories of the spirit realm to be an obstacle to belief in the afterlife.

If the brain is a filter of consciousness rather than producing consciousness, then while we are incarnated, turning off the brain with anesthesia might plausibly produce the effect you describe.

http://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/sk...cies_brain
I 'tend heavily' toward believing in reincarnation and the afterlife. I too, don't consider lack of memories to be an obstacle, but let's stick to what we know about this experience during this lifetime.

It worries me somewhat, that what I consider to be 'my consciousness' can be switched off. Still, I'm obviously not dead in that state, as, as far as I know, we can't revive the dead!  LOL

I wonder what the trigger is for 'death'? What line do we cross to start the non-human side of the process? I'll try searching for testimony from coma sufferers that have survived. See what they have to say?
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#6
(10-09-2017, 08:43 AM)Stan Woolley Wrote: In other words, during an operation, 'light out' to 'lights on' seems instantaneous. Nothing else has that effect, as far as I can work out.

The effect of time passing is a strange one. I'm unable to comment on the effects of anaesthesia. But I do recall an incident where I fainted (due to suddenly standing up after being seated for a while) and on awakening seconds later asked "where am I?" - I was surprised not to be in my bed, and it felt as though hours had passed. It certainly didn't feel 'instantaneous' when in reality that was exactly what it was.
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#7
(10-09-2017, 09:50 AM)Typoz Wrote: The effect of time passing is a strange one. I'm unable to comment on the effects of anaesthesia. But I do recall an incident where I fainted (due to suddenly standing up after being seated for a while) and on awakening seconds later asked "where am I?" - I was surprised not to be in my bed, and it felt as though hours had passed. It certainly didn't feel 'instantaneous' when in reality that was exactly what it was.

Have you never had an op? That's surely a good sign? Maybe?  Wink

I've had at a guess, ten? Mainly when I was young, I was a sickly kid! Living in Africa didn't help either.
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#8
(10-09-2017, 10:55 AM)Stan Woolley Wrote: Have you never had an op? That's surely a good sign? Maybe?  Wink

I've had at a guess, ten? Mainly when I was young, I was a sickly kid! Living in Africa didn't help either.

Well, I've had my share of ill health too. But mostly requiring pills, potions and  things to be applied to the inside or outside of the body.
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#9
(10-09-2017, 09:14 AM)Stan Woolley Wrote: I'll try searching for testimony from coma sufferers that have survived. See what they have to say?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/articl...-coma.html
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#10
(10-09-2017, 08:14 AM)Stan Woolley Wrote: Anyone who's had an operation under general anaesthetic knows that, at least in my case, it's the only time in my life that we really 'lost consciousness'. From the time that the chemical is injected and starting to count backwards from 100, 99,98, 97,96....then waking up maybe hours later! 

This seems to imply that our consciousness can be switched off by drugs. 

If it can be switched off by drugs, why not switched on by drugs? i.e. Generated by the brain.

Thoughts?

It baffles me why some members are so set against brain creating consciousness. It's even much more baffling why they go to great lengths to answer that why by giving another mysterious answer that consciousness lives outside the brain that the brain is just a radio reciever by analogy. I've read one member stating memories aren't in the brain.
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