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The Death of Are
#1
I'm fascinated that in my own lifetime a major change has happened within the spoken language. At least in the United States we have moved from:

"There are new updates."

to

"There is new updates."

I'm baffled, angered, confused, horrified. This usage is becoming ubiquitous, even among broadcasters.
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#2
(09-25-2017, 02:17 PM)chuck Wrote: I'm fascinated that in my own lifetime a major change has happened within the spoken language. At least in the United States we have moved from:

"There are new updates."

to

"There is new updates."

I'm baffled, angered, confused, horrified. This usage is becoming ubiquitous, even among broadcasters.

I've noticed the incorrect use of the word ignorant recently too, Chuck.
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#3
(09-25-2017, 02:21 PM)tim Wrote: I've noticed the incorrect use of the word ignorant recently too, Chuck.

In that case you are truly ignorant.
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#4
(09-25-2017, 02:22 PM)chuck Wrote: In that case you are truly ignorant.

And you are willfully ignorant !
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#5
So as not to derail the other thread. From the Oxford English Dictionary:

1. Destitute of knowledge, either in general OR with respect to a particular fact or subject.

2. Uninformed or unskilled in, not acquainted with a subject.

3. Showing absence of knowledge, resulting from ignorance.

=========

The word itself is basically a negation of the greek work gnosis. (Gnosis=Knowledge.)
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#6
(09-25-2017, 02:33 PM)tim Wrote: And you are willfully ignorant !

You clearly don't know the difference between connotation and denotation. Just look it up. It isn't difficult to understand.
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#7
(09-25-2017, 02:35 PM)chuck Wrote: So as not to derail the other thread. From the Oxford English Dictionary:

1. Destitute of knowledge, either in general OR with respect to a particular fact or subject.

2. Uninformed or unskilled in, not acquainted with a subject.

3. Showing absence of knowledge, resulting from ignorance.

=========

The word itself is basically a negation of the greek work gnosis. (Gnosis=Knowledge.)

I also quoted from the Oxford dictionary. The quotes I presented are the informal definitions.

informal Discourteous or rude.
‘Synonyms
rude, impolite, ill-mannered, bad-mannered, unmannerly, ungracious, discourteous, insensitive, uncivil, ill-humoured, surly, sullen
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#8
Tim. You do understand that I am talking about the denotation of the word? The "literal" meaning. I'm not talking about the various connotations of the word. Do you understand that there is a difference?
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#9
(09-25-2017, 02:37 PM)chuck Wrote: You clearly don't know the difference between connotation and denotation. Just look it up. It isn't difficult to understand.

Teach your Grandmother to suck eggs, Chuck and then look up the word patronizing.
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#10
(09-25-2017, 02:56 PM)chuck Wrote: Tim. You do understand that I am talking about the denotation of the word? The "literal" meaning. I'm not talking about the various connotations of the word. Do you understand that there is a difference?

Are you having me on ?
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