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Awake Under Anesthesia
#1
Article by Joshua Rothman in the New Yorker: Awake Under Anesthesia. Start of the article:

Quote:One day in the nineteen-eighties, a woman went to the hospital for cancer surgery. The procedure was a success, and all of the cancer was removed. In the weeks afterward, though, she felt that something was wrong. She went back to her surgeon, who reassured her that the cancer was gone; she consulted a psychiatrist, who gave her pills for depression. Nothing helped—she grew certain that she was going to die. She met her surgeon a second time. When he told her, once again, that everything was fine, she suddenly blurted out, “The black stuff—you didn’t get the black stuff!” The surgeon’s eyes widened. He remembered that, during the operation, he had idly complained to a colleague about the black mold in his bathroom, which he could not remove no matter what he did. The cancer had been in the woman’s abdomen, and during the operation she had been under general anesthesia; even so, it seemed that the surgeon’s words had lodged in her mind. As soon as she discovered what had happened, her anxiety dissipated.Henry Bennett, an American psychologist, tells this story to Kate Cole-Adams, an Australian journalist, in her book “Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness.”

Cole-Adams hears many similar stories from other anesthesiologists and psychologists: apparently, people can hear things while under anesthesia, and can be affected by what they hear even if they can’t remember it. One woman suffers from terrible insomnia after her hysterectomy; later, while hypnotized, she recalls her anesthesiologist joking that she would “sleep the sleep of death.” Another patient becomes suicidal after a minor procedure; later, she remembers that, while she was on the table, her surgeon exclaimed, “She is fat, isn’t she?” In the nineteen-nineties, German scientists put headphones on thirty people undergoing heart surgery, then, during the operation, played them an abridged version of “Robinson Crusoe.” None of the patients recalled this happening, but afterward, when asked what came to mind when they heard the word “Friday,” many mentioned the story. In 1985, Bennett himself asked patients receiving gallbladder or spinal surgeries to wear headphones. A control group heard the sounds of the operating theatre; the others heard Bennett saying, “When I come to talk with you, you will pull on your ear.” When they met with him, those who’d heard the message touched their ears three times more often than those who hadn’t. (...)
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"In the nineteen-nineties, German scientists put headphones on thirty people undergoing heart surgery, then, during the operation, played them an abridged version of “Robinson Crusoe.” None of the patients recalled this happening, but afterward, when asked what came to mind when they heard the word “Friday,” many mentioned the story."

I wonder what sceptics would make of that protocol if it was used in a psi experiment!  Skeptic
"There are more things in philosophy than are dreamt of in heaven and earth."
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(01-06-2018, 07:53 AM)Ninshub Wrote: Article by Joshua Rothman in the New Yorker: Awake Under Anesthesia. Start of the article:

There are lots of these studies, Ian Russell at Hull, UK has also done lots of work on anesthetic awareness, and found similar results. They all seem to show implicit learning is possible under light to medium anesthetic, and some patients seem to have some explicit recall as well.

Taking the classic Cardiac Arrest NDE/OBE's on the operating table... if the anesthesia gas is stored in the blood, and the blood stops circulating during cardiac arrest... can one say that the gas only acts if it is present, and circulating in the part of organism which the gas acts upon. (bearing in mind we don't know how it works)

If one says that the gas acts by disrupting some mechanism/s. Could loss of circulation very quickly lead to insufficient anesthetic gas at the sites where the disrupting mechanism operates.

Could loss of circulation cause the anesthesia's disrupting effects to cease far faster than would be possible with an organism that had normal circulation.
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